Thursday, January 04, 2007

These labels and diversions…

While the middle-east mess looks more and more like a slow motion runaway train, heading for cataclysmic disaster, we are still playing semantics and short term politics rather than face the truth.

The Iraq war was always a cynical political exercise, devoid of any benefit to the world at large. But greed and irresponsible domestic politics, in a number of countries, has generally been sold as something more high minded.

Scratch the surface, ignore the weak rationalisations and dubious arguments, and we are faced with facts few people really want to be forced to accept – our institutions of government do not serve our (the peoples) interests.

reality-based educator talks about "Insisting on "Victory" in Iraq": The NY Times says the administration knew it's Iraq war policy was a disaster as early as last summer but didn't want to do anything before the midterm elections because it would make it look like the administration didn't have a plan for victory:

The administration only ever had a plan for their own political victory and quick oil money for their corporate buddies. They have even failed in those aims, and are bankrupt of ideas when it comes to solutions for any of the mess they have created.

Iraq is in the hands of an equally self serving bunch, with no loyalty to the western saviors or the people of their own country.

But when their true colours are exposed they can certainly play western politics:

Iraqi authorities have arrested one of the guards at Saddam Hussein's execution as part of a probe into how a film of his hanging was released on the internet, a government spokesman said. AFP


It’s a great game; denial, deflected blame, obfuscation, outright lies. The incredible part is that is so transparent, but we sit in front of that runaway train like rabbits caught in the headlights.


On related issues, Praguetwin comments, “Yep, you are right. It is hard to drive that point home without being labelled a communist or someone calling for class war. Comments - A Happy New Era?


Why do we continue to accept transparent and monstrous lies from our political leaders? Is it really better to just accept the dubious behaviour and dreadful consequences than to recognize the reality? Of course recognizing the reality demands action, and how do you act against the machinery of an entrenched political/ corporate juggernaught?

For a start, we could stop accepting obfuscation and name calling as excuses for real argument. We can stop accepting the lame argument that we don’t have access to the real truth.


At the very least we must reject any elements from discussions which don’t stand up to rigorous argument. It is a bottom up (or at perhaps centre up) approach which demands greater exposure of government and the media.


At worst it means accepting the fact that our public leaders are not nearly good enough, that they are not serving the people. At best, slowly, we might be able to steer to terms of political engagement to a more honest and equitable level.

3 comments:

Kvatch said...

Is it really better to just accept the dubious behaviour and dreadful consequences than to recognize the reality?

Apparently...yes. How else can we explain the US gearing up to send another 20K-30K troops into harm's way when war simulations done in 1999 showed that we'd need to double our troop strength.

How to you grok a megalomaniac so cowed by his mistake that he'll compound by throwing more troops into a lost engagement. Bush reminds me of the Hollywood general who prefers to go down fighting to a tactical retreat.

abi said...

It’s a great game; denial, deflected blame, obfuscation, outright lies. The incredible part is that is so transparent...

[H]ow do you act against the machinery of an entrenched political/ corporate juggernaught?


A great observation and a great question. The only answer I have, at the risk of being a repetitive moop, is the same as the other day - take the money out of politics.

We need to impose strict contribution limits and spending limits, even on a candidate's own money. And we need to end paid lobbying.

Yes it's radical, but sometimes radical surgery is called for.

Cartledge said...

I've got thoughts on MOOP, and some background, so I will play with it some.
I really think the expectation of better should be talked about more, and solutions are helpful too.